Books that Coranne Did Not Finish

By Charlotte Silver
Published on May 20th 2014
Published by Roaring Brook Press
Source: Publisher
Two sisters are summoned to their aunt's Greenwich Village flat, where they must start dressing like young ladies, cultivate their artistic sensibilities, and open themselves up to Life with a capital L.

When Franny and her older sister Valentine are summoned by their Aunt Theodora from foggy San Francisco to sunny New York City for one summer, they are taken to old-world locales like Bemelmans Bar, the Plaza, and the Sherry Netherland by their chaperone, Clover, Aunt Theodora’s protégé. As they discover New York City going lingerie shopping and learning about the simple elegance of a cucumber sandwich, they also begin to unearth secrets and answers about Aunt Theo's glamorous and romantic past, and they have a few romantic adventures of their own.
I really wanted to like this one.  It sounds so so awesome.  But it wasn't.  I found the characters so un-relatable that I couldn't bear to read about them.  The main narrator, Franny, sounds like a wealthy woman in her 50s, not a 14 year old girl. The story was written in a way that it wanted to sound smart- I don't know, perhaps it was smarter than me, but I found it completely and absolutely not engaging.




By Elizabeth May
Published on May 6th 2014
Published by Chronicle Books
Source: Publisher
Heiress. Debutant. Murderer. A new generation of heroines has arrived.

Edinburgh, Scotland, 1844

Lady Aileana Kameron, the only daughter of the Marquess of Douglas, was destined for a life carefully planned around Edinburgh’s social events – right up until a faery killed her mother.

Now it’s the 1844 winter season and Aileana slaughters faeries in secret, in between the endless round of parties, tea and balls. Armed with modified percussion pistols and explosives, she sheds her aristocratic facade every night to go hunting. She’s determined to track down the faery who murdered her mother, and to destroy any who prey on humans in the city’s many dark alleyways.

But the balance between high society and her private war is a delicate one, and as the fae infiltrate the ballroom and Aileana’s father returns home, she has decisions to make. How much is she willing to lose – and just how far will Aileana go for revenge?
Perhaps it was the wrong place and wrong time with this book.  I have heard fantastic things about this book, but it wasn't clicking for me- I found myself doing other tasks so that I wouldn't have to read. I don't really have any big beef with it, other than I found it uninteresting.  Is this a book I should keep going with?  If so, please let me know!




By Katherine Harbour
Published on June 24th 2014
Published by Harper Voyager
Source: Publisher
They call us things with teeth. These words from Lily Rose Sullivan the night of her death haunts her seventeen-year-old sister, Finn, who has moved with her widowed father to his hometown of Fair Hollow, New York. After befriending a boy named Christie Hart and his best friend, Sylvie Whitethorn, Finn is invited to a lakeside party where she encounters the alluring Jack Fata, a member of the town's mysterious Fata family. Despite Jack's air of danger and his clever words, Finn learns they have things in common.

One day, while unpacking, Finn finds her sister's journal, scrawled with descriptions of creatures that bear a sinister resemblance to Jack's family. Finn dismisses these stories as fiction, but Jack's family has a secret—the Fatas are the children of nothing and night, nomadic beings who have been preying on humanity for centuries—and Jack fears that his friendship with Finn has drawn the attention of the most dangerous members of his family—Reiko Fata and vicious Caliban, otherwise known as the white snake and the crooked dog.

Plagued with nightmares about her sister, Finn attempts to discover what happened to Lily Rose and begins to suspect that the Fatas are somehow tied to Lily Rose's untimely death. Drawn to Jack, determined to solve the mystery of her sister's suicide, Finn must navigate a dangerous world where nothing is as it seems
I have absolutely no idea what this book is supposed to be about.  I read 100 pages and I felt absolutely confused.  I have a beef with these kinda of books - they are all mystery and vagueness and then I end up feeling like I am not sure what the actual plot of the book is. I am sure this would make a great movie, or TV show, but this book just couldn't hold my attention.





By Emily Lloyd-Jones
Published on July 15, 2014
Published by Little Brown Books
Source: Netgalley
The X-Men meets Ocean's Eleven in this edge-of-your-seat sci-fi adventure about a band of "super" criminals.

When the MK virus swept across the planet, a vaccine was created to stop the epidemic, but it came with some unexpected side effects. A small percentage of the population developed superhero-like powers. Seventeen-year-old Ciere Giba has the handy ability to change her appearance at will. She's what's known as an illusionist...She's also a thief.

After a robbery goes awry, Ciere must team up with a group of fellow super-powered criminals on another job that most would consider too reckless. The formula for the vaccine that gave them their abilities was supposedly destroyed years ago. But what if it wasn't?

The lines between good and bad, us and them, and freedom and entrapment are blurred as Ciere and the rest of her crew become embroiled in a deadly race against the government that could cost them their lives
Do I have a good reason for DNF-ing this one?  Nope.  I just thought it was boring.  Don't worry though, I am in the minority!

1 comment:

  1. Well, bummer about The Falconer and Illusive. Both of those are high on my tbr. I'll have to see if I feel the same way. I like how honest you are though, that they just didn't engage you.

    Tressa @ Wishful Endings

    ReplyDelete

BLOG DESIGN BY DESIGNER BLOGS